Greek Language and Literature

Spring 2018 Courses

CLGR 10002/60002 01

Beginning Greek II

Prof. A. Pistone

MW 12:30-1:45

Also meets F 12:50-1:40

4 credits

Prerequisite:  CLGR 10001/60001

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 10001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 10002 is offered each spring semester.

 

CLGR 20004/60004

Reading and Writing Greek Prose

Prof. C. Baron

TR 11:00-12:15

3 credits

Recommended for students who have completed CLGR 20003 or equivalent.

This fourth-semester language course continues the review of grammar and translating of texts begun in CLGR 20003. It introduces students to stylistic analysis through close readings of excerpts from a variety of Ancient Greek authors (mostly in prose). Knowledge of syntax will be reinforced by composing sentences and larger units in Greek.

CLGR 30011/60011

Homer and Epic Hexameter

Prof. Aldo Tagliabue

MW 2:00-3:15

3 credits

Recommended for students who have completed CLGR 20003 or equivalent.

This third-year course builds on CLGR 20003 and CLGR 20004 by offering a close reading of the earliest Greek epic poetry. Homer’s epic poems stand at the head of the tradition of European literature; their themes and poetic style have substantially influenced the works of Vergil, Dante, Milton, and many other writers. The focus of this year’s class will be the so-called Apologoi, Odysseus’ narration of his own journey at Alcinous’ court (books 9-12). By focusing on the Apologoi, we will be able to read and hear the first ever produced account of fiction in the Western tradition. Odysseus’ account will be discussed in its cultural context and read as a narrative filled with suspense and surprise; features of poetic oral composition will additionally be examined. Finally, measurable attention will be given to later interpretations of Odysseus’ journey within ancient Greek and Latin literature, with a focus on Polyphemus and the Sirens. If you’d like to be bewitched by Odysseus’ cunning voice, in the same way that Alcinous and many other ancient Greeks afterwards were bewitched, this is the class for you.

Fall 2017 Courses

CLGR 10001/60001

Beginning Greek I

Prof. A. Pistone

MWF 10:30 - 11:20 and T 9:30 - 10:20, 4 credits

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. 

CLGR 20003/60003

Intermediate Greek

Prof. A. Tagliabue

MWF 2:00 - 2:50, 3 credits

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Greek I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors such as Homer and Plato. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the rich literature of the ancient Greeks. Offered every semester. 

CLGR 30050/60050 (Cross-list THEO 83003)

Greek Literature in the Roman and Judeo-Christian Worlds

Prof. C. Baron

TR 12:30 - 1:45, 3 credits

This course offers readings in a wide variety of Greek texts from the Hellenistic and Roman imperial periods. It is designed to build upon Intermediate Greek, further improving students' knowledge of Greek vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. After completing this course students will have reached an advanced level of reading proficiency in ancient Greek. Authors to be read include, among others, Philo, Josephus, Plutarch, Pausanias, Lucian, Dio Chrysostom, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Eusebius, Julian, and Libanius. Books of the Septuagint and the New Testament may also be read. The aim of the course is to show students the literary culture in which Judeo-Christian literature developed and of which it came to form a part. This course may fulfill the Greek requirement for graduate students in Theology. Please consult your advisor. 

CLGR 30070

Intoxicating Poetry: Wine and Greek Literature

Prof. A. Pistone

TR 12:30-1:45

This course uses dramatic texts to explore ancient Greek perspectives on drinking--what role did wine and intoxication play in Greek culture? Students will read Euripides' Cyclops and Bacchae in Greek and will supplement those readings with selections (in English) from Plato's Symposium, Xenophon's Symposium, and the comedies of Aristophanes, as well as some excerpts from lyric poets. Students should leave this course with an understanding of the role that intoxication played in 5th century BCE Greek literature and should be comfortable with the meter, language, and conventions of Greek tragic and satyr plays. Recommended for students who have completed CLGR 20003 or equivalent.

CLGR 60510/40510

Survey of Greek Literature from Homer to Plato

Prof. A. Tagliabue

TR 11:00 - 12:15, 3 credits

This survey of archaic and classical Greek literature traces the development of the major genres and literary movements from Homer to Plato. We shall read in Greek selections from the major texts of epic, lyric, tragedy, comedy, historiography, oratory, and philosophy. Additional readings will include other Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important scholarly studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and scholarly methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Greek literature.