Latin Language and Literature

Spring 2018 Courses

CLLA 10001/60001 01

Beginning Latin I

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 9:25-10:15, 4 credits

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

CLLA 10002/60002 01

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 11:30-12:20, 4 credits

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

CLLA 10002/60002 02

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

TBA

MWF 8:20-9:10, 4 credits

 

CLLA 20003/60003 01

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 3 credits

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

CLLA 20003/60003 02

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

Prof. G. Müller

MWF 3:30-4:20, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002/60002 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

CLLA 30012

Latin History-Writing

Prof. E. Mazurek

MW 9:30-10:45, 3 credits

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003, and offers close reading of passages from the works of Livy and Tacitus, specifically, Livy’s account of the Second Punic War and Tacitus’ Agricola.  We will be looking carefully at Livy’s portraits of Hannibal and Scipio Africanus, written in the Augustan era, and Tacitus’ portrait of his father-in-law Agricola, written later in the Flavian era, in order to understand Roman concepts of leadership and how these change over time.  We will also examine trends in Roman historiography more generally, including the political and social conditions in Rome that informed historical writing as well as the literary hallmarks of the genre.  The course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature.  

 

CLLA 40023

Elegaic Roman Poetry

Prof. K. Schlegel

MW 3:30-4:45, 3 credits

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills

This advanced course introduces students to Latin elegy, a form of verse that served Roman poets as a vehicle for expressing and exploring personal feelings, especially those associated with love. Readings from Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid expose how Roman poets adapted and experimented with the elegiac form to express highly charged personal emotions often at odds with conventional Roman values.

 

CLLA 43098

The Digital Schoolbook

Prof. M. Bloomer

TR 9:30-10:45, 3 credits

The Digital Schoolbook seminar examines the history of educational practice as it can be deduced from extant materials. In brief we will plunge into the many texts, issues, and schoolings that brought liberal education to and through the Middle Ages and into the theoretical considerations in educational (cultural and intellectual) history. In addition to training in the relevant archival, historical, and textual methods, the seminar will introduce foundational skills  and theory of digital humanities. Dr. F. Fischer of the Cologne Center for eHumanities will join us in February for intensive instruction in digital scholarship and especially digital editing. Students will be introduced to TEI and to the range of issues in planning, designing, and implementing a collaborative DH research project. Finally, given interest, students may develop projects suitable for internships at the CCeH.

 

CLLA 40510/60510

Latin Survey I: The Birth and Growth of Latin Literature

Prof. B. Krostenko

TR 2:00-3:15, 3 credits

This class offers an overview of Latin literature from its origins in the 3rd century to the late Republic.  During this period, as the poet Horace put it, Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit “Captured Greece captured her savage conqueror”: Greek literary forms--epic, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric--provided the models for literature in Latin.  But these adaptations were never simple copies: the values of the Romans’ militarist society lie close to the surface.  Furthermore the values of that society were hardly static but themselves developed as Rome grew from a regional power into a world empire.  The chief purpose of this class is to grasp the dual identity of Roman literature: what does it owe to the Greek world? And what does it owe to its own developing social world?  Additional topics include the formal development of the Latin language; the development of Latin meters, especially the hexameter; and native Italic literary forms (e.g. farces and Saturnian epitaphs).  Authors to be read include Plautus, Naevius, Ennius, Terence, Lucilius, Cicero, Lucretius, Caesar, Sallust and Catullus.

 

Fall 2017 Courses

CLLA 10001/60001 01

Beginning Latin I (Section 1)

Instructor: William Stover

MWF 8:20 - 9:10, 4 credits

This Latin course initiates a two-semester sequence that introduces students to the language and culture of the ancient Romans. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. This is a hybrid course; a significant portion of the learning will be done by students working independently online. A deeper appreciation for English grammar and ancient Roman culture will be fostered through class discussion and attentive reading. This course is offered every semester. 

 

CLLA 10001/60001 02

Beginning Latin I (Section 2)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 11:30 - 12:20, 4 credits

 

CLLA 10002/60002 01

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 9:25 - 10:15, 4 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

CLLA 10002/60002 02

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

Nick Churik

MWF 2:00 - 2:50, 4 credits

 

CLLA 20003/60003 01

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 2:00 - 2:50, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002/60002 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cicero and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered every semester. 

 

CLLA 20003/60003 02

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

Prof. C. Schlegel

MWF 12:50 - 1:40, 3 credits

 

CLLA 20003/60003 03

Intermediate Latin (Section 3)

Prof. M. Bloomer

MW 8:00 - 9:15, 3 credits

 

CLLA 30015/60015

Ovid's Metamorphoses

Prof. E. Mazurek

TR 2:00 - 3:15, 3 credits

In this course, we translate and discuss selected passages from the Metamorphoses, Ovid's idiosyncratic poetic history of the world. Topics for our discussions include the spiritual, moral, religious, political, and physical transformations portrayed between the creation story at the beginning and the deification of Caesar at the end of the text; the tension between Ovid's adherence to Roman traditions and his irreverent, sometimes subversive, artistic originality; the poem's narrative techniques, poetic style, and structure; the significance of intertextual allusions to Greek drama, Virgilian epic, and Ovid's own love poetry; the instability of gender; portraits of the poet within the work; and the innumerable faces of love, as presented through characters who are pious, raging with passion, inseperable, violent, infatuated, lovesick, devoted, and much more. Above all, this course aims at clarifying how Ovid's inexhaustible playfulness and delightful wit contributed to shaping a work of both epic grandeur and lyric intimacy that continues to inspire poets, composers, novelists, painters, and at least one playwright whose version recently made it all the way to Broadway. Daily preparation and active participation in class are essential components of the course; brief written assignments, one mid-term exam, one brief project, and a final exam also count towards the final grade. 

 

CLLA 40016/60016 (Cross-list MI 40003/60003)

Introduction to Christian Texts

Prof. W. Bloomer

TR 3:30 - 4:45, 3 credits

This class surveys the development of Christian Latin language and literature from their origins through Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. It introduces students to the various important linguistic, stylistic and literary influences that contributed to Christian Latin poetry and prose. Students will also be introduced to the varieties of Christian Latin texts and the bibliographical and research skills needed to pursue research into these texts. All along we will be concerned to improve our abilities to read and understand the Latin of the tradition that stretches from the first translations of scripture to the treatises of Jerome and Augustine. The survey of Medieval Latin language and literature in the spring semester follows and builds upon this course. 

 

CLLA 40039/60039

Latin Letters

Prof. H. Muller

MW 2:00 - 3:15, 3 credits

This advanced course in Latin prose literature examines the Roman epistolary tradition. Focusing on the letters of the younger Pliny, it studies them first as a self-conscious portrait for posterity of a prominent Roman senator of the early Antonine age, and second as a set of documents that reveal features of Roman social, political, economic and cultural life. In addition to Pliny's letters, students will read selections from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Augustine or Jerome. Close attention will be given to the different prose styles of each author and his innovations within the genre.