Requirements

To earn the Masters in Classics, students must satisfactorily complete 36 class credits, a reading list, and several examinations. Students also have the option of writing a Masters Thesis.

Coursework

Students will take 36 credits over 2 years in the MA program. The curriculum is well-defined, but includes room for adjustment based on students’ individual needs and interests. The details of any particular student’s coursework will depend on the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the Graduate Committee. Here's a list of our current courses.

The chart below shows the curriculum that will normally be offered, followed by specific examples for different specialties. Students can choose from several areas of emphasis, including language and literature, history, late antiquity, and philosophy. Years A and B will alternate based on the courses offered that year; some students will begin in Year A, others in Year B.

General Curriculum

YEAR A

YEAR B

 Topics and Methods in Classical Studies

 Ancient History seminar

 Survey of Latin Literature

 Survey of Greek Literature

  Advanced level language

  Advanced level language

  Advanced level language

  Advanced level language/history/elective

  Advanced level language

  Thesis (or advanced level language)

  Advanced level language/history/elective

  Thesis or Comprehensive Examination

Emphasis in Greek and Latin Literature

YEAR A

YEAR B

 Topics and Methods course

Ancient History seminar

 Survey of Latin Literature

Survey of Greek Literature

 Survey of Latin Christian Literature

Greek author course

 Latin author course

Latin author course

 Greek author course

Latin author course

 Greek author course

Thesis

Emphasis in History

YEAR A

YEAR B

 Topics and Methods course

Ancient History seminar

 Survey of Latin Literature

Archaeology elective

 Greek author course

Latin author course

 Latin author course

Greek author course

 Ancient History Seminar

Elective course (early Medieval history)

 Greek author course

Thesis

Emphasis in Late Antiquity

YEAR A

YEAR B

 Topics and Methods course

Ancient History seminar

 Survey of Latin Literature

Survey of Greek Literature

 Survey of Latin Christian Literature

Latin author course

 Greek author course

Latin author course

 Elective class (e.g. Patristics in Theology)

Greek author course

 Survey of Medieval Literature

Thesis

Emphasis in Philosophy

YEAR A

YEAR B

 Topics and Methods course

Ancient History seminar

 Survey of Latin Literature

Survey of Greek Literature

 Greek author class

Greek author class

 Greek author class

Latin author class

 Latin author class

Philosophy Seminar

 Philosophy Seminar

Thesis

Reading List

In addition to completing all course requirements, students will be expected to read a list of texts in preparation for their examinations and for further study in the field of Classics. This reading list will be compiled with a view to the needs and interests of individual students by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Committee.

Exams

  • Greek and Latin:
    • Students will be required to take examinations in Greek and/or Latin translation at the beginning of their fourth semester, with the possibility of taking the exam again in the spring. The exam will be based on a standard reading list of core texts, though some adjustment may be made according to individual needs. 
  • Modern Languages:
    • Since German, French and Italian are of major importance for research, all students will be required to demonstrate reading proficiency in one of these languages by passing an appropriate examination. 
  • Comprehensive Examination:
    • Students choosing not to write a thesis will be required to take a comprehensive written and oral examination at the end of the fourth semester. Unlike the Greek and Latin examinations, the comprehensive examination will focus on broad topics pertaining to classical history, literature, and culture.

Thesis

With departmental permission, students will have the option of writing a final MA paper in a 3-credit or 6-credit version. Students intending to go on to PhD programs will be advised to exercise this option especially.  Students writing a thesis will not be required to take the comprehensive examination.

Back to Top