Greek Language and Literature

Spring 2019

Beginning Greek II

CLGR 10002/60002
Prof. T. Mazurek
MW 12:30-1:45, F 12:50-1:40

Prerequisite for CLGR 10002:  CLGR 10001
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 10001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 10002 is offered each spring semester.

Sophocles

CLGR 30053/60053
Prof. A. Pistone
MW 12:30-1:45

Recommended for students with advanced Greek skills. 
This advanced course offers accelerated reading and detailed study of the tragic plays of Sophocles, the second of classical Athens' great trio of tragedians. The course concentrates on Sophocles' refinement of the model of tragedy developed by Aeschylus, and examines the ways in which his plays established a paradigm for Aristotle's treatment of tragedy in the Poetics. Other topics studied include Sophocles' abiding metaphors of blindness and knowledge and their relationship to the mythical tradition and contemporary philosophical debates.

The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative

CLGR 40033/60033
Prof. A. Tagliabue
MW 3:30-4:45

Recommended for students with advanced Greek skills
Up until 1989, when B. P. Reardon’s translation of the Greek novels was published, scholars of ancient Greek literature, who previously denied any interest in what they suspiciously defined as post-classical literature, had largely neglected the study of ancient novels. In recent decades, this trend has been inverted. Many studies have now been published which mostly focus on the five extant ancient novels: Chariton’s Callirhoe, Xenophon’s Ephesiaca, Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe and Cleitophon and Heliodorus’ Aethiopica.
Moreover, in the last few years, a new trend has been emerging within Classics, namely to compare at greater length these ancient novels with both Jewish and Christian narratives. For example, the study of Joseph and Aseneth and the Acts of Paul and Thecla, among other texts, has pointed out the existence of strong similarities within all these texts in both their narrative form and their focus on love. This has led some to suggest that the genre of the Greek novel might be both a multicultural enterprise and a key component of the literature of the Imperial Era.
This advanced Greek class follows this recent trend and invites students to read and compare selections of the following texts: Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe and Cleitophon, Heliodorus’ Aethiopica, Joseph and Aseneth, and The Acts of Andrew. Students will be introduced to a close analysis of both the koine Greek and the main structural components of these texts. In particular, students will be taught with the help of narratology, intertextuality with the Odyssey and Plato’s Phaedrus, characterization and gender studies. Special attention will be given to the identification of shared themes between the texts, and to the intriguing relationship between faithful love as it is portrayed in the Greek novel, and Jewish and Christian love to God.
Finally, students will reflect on how all these narratives respond to the challenges of their contemporary historical context, which was characterized both by the Romans’ control over the Greeks, the rise of Christianity, and the emergence of a new attention to the human person and to women in particular.

Plutarch

CLGR 40042/60042
Prof. C. Baron
TR 9:30-10:45

Recommended for students with advanced Greek skills
This advanced course introduces students to the most famous biographical literature from antiquity, Plutarch’s Parallel Lives.  Illuminating the virtues and vices of famous and infamous men from Greek and Roman history, the Parallel Lives offers an important guide to understanding the ethical imperatives of the Greco-Roman world.  Plutarch’s literary style, his conception of biography, and the Roman imperial context in which he wrote are key themes for discussion in the course.

 

Fall 2018 Courses

 

Beginning Greek I

CLGR 10001 01/60001

Prof. T. Mazurek

MW 11:00-12:15 and F 11:30-12:20, 4 credit hours

Prerequisite for CLGR 10002:  CLGR 10001

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 10001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 10002 is offered each spring semester.

 

 

Intermediate Greek

CLGR 20003 01/60003

Prof. A. Pistone

MWF 10:30-11:20, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CLGR 10002, CLGR 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Greek I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Greek authors such as Homer and Plato. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Greek literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the rich literature of the ancient Greeks. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Greek Texts in the Roman and Judeo-Christian Worlds

CLGR 60050/30050

Prof. A. Tagliabue

TR 2:00-3:15, 3 credit hours

This course offers readings in a wide variety of Greek texts from the Hellenistic and Roman imperial periods. It is designed to build upon Intermediate Greek, further improving students' knowledge of Greek vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. After completing this course students will have reached an advanced level of reading proficiency in ancient Greek. Authors to be read include, among others, Philo, Josephus, Plutarch, Pausanias, Lucian, Dio Chrysostom, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Eusebius, Julian, and Libanius. Books of the Septuagint and the New Testament may also be read. The aim of the course is to show students the literary culture in which Judeo-Christian literature developed and of which it came to form a part. This course may fulfill the Greek requirement for graduate students in Theology. Please consult your advisor. 

 

 

Greek Paleography

CLGR 40118/60118 (Cross-listed MI 60006 and THEO 60030)

Prof. D. Gura

MW 9:30-10:45, 3 credits

This course is an introduction to Greek paleography and provides an overview of uncial and minuscule scripts used in papyri, manuscript books, and the early imprints. Students will develop the skills necessary to read, transcribe, and contextualize Greek manuscripts. Areas include: letter forms, abbreviations, ligatures, dating, localization, formal vs. informal hands, scriptoria, and individual scribes. Emphasis is placed on manuscripts and scripts from Late Antiquity through the Byzantine period and Italian Renaissance. Students will work with Notre Dame?s small but illustrative collection of papyri, Byzantine manuscripts, and Greek imprints. Intermediate knowledge of Greek is required.

 

 

Greek Survey II: Greek Literature in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods

CLGR 40520 01/60520

Prof. C. Baron

MW 11:00-12:15, 3 credit hours

This survey of Greek literature in the Hellenistic and Roman periods traces the development of the major genres and literary movements in “post-Classical” Greek. We shall read in Greek selections from the Alexandrian poets, Greek historians of Rome, authors of the Second Sophistic, and orators of the Late Roman Empire. Additional readings will include other Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important modern studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Greek literature.

Spring 2018 Courses
 

Beginning Greek II

CLGR 10002/60002 01

Prof. A. Pistone

MW 12:30-1:45

Also meets F 12:50-1:40

4 credits

Prerequisite:  CLGR 10001/60001

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Greeks for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Greek texts. An appreciation for ancient Greek culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. CLGR 10001 is offered each fall semester and CLGR 10002 is offered each spring semester.

 

 

Reading and Writing Greek Prose

CLGR 20004/60004

Prof. C. Baron

TR 11:00-12:15

3 credits
Recommended for students who have completed CLGR 20003 or equivalent.
This fourth-semester language course continues the review of grammar and translating of texts begun in CLGR 20003. It introduces students to stylistic analysis through close readings of excerpts from a variety of Ancient Greek authors (mostly in prose). Knowledge of syntax will be reinforced by composing sentences and larger units in Greek.

 

 

Homer and Epic Hexameter

CLGR 30011/60011

Prof. Aldo Tagliabue

MW 2:00-3:15

3 credits

Recommended for students who have completed CLGR 20003 or equivalent.
This third-year course builds on CLGR 20003 and CLGR 20004 by offering a close reading of the earliest Greek epic poetry. Homer’s epic poems stand at the head of the tradition of European literature; their themes and poetic style have substantially influenced the works of Vergil, Dante, Milton, and many other writers. The focus of this year’s class will be the so-called Apologoi, Odysseus’ narration of his own journey at Alcinous’ court (books 9-12). By focusing on the Apologoi, we will be able to read and hear the first ever produced account of fiction in the Western tradition. Odysseus’ account will be discussed in its cultural context and read as a narrative filled with suspense and surprise; features of poetic oral composition will additionally be examined. Finally, measurable attention will be given to later interpretations of Odysseus’ journey within ancient Greek and Latin literature, with a focus on Polyphemus and the Sirens. If you’d like to be bewitched by Odysseus’ cunning voice, in the same way that Alcinous and many other ancient Greeks afterwards were bewitched, this is the class for you.