Latin Language and Literature

Spring 2022

Beginning Latin I and II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Instructor: TBA, MWF 8:20-9:10

4 credit hours

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Prof. T. Mazurek, MWF 11:30-12:20

4 credit hours

CLLA 10002/60002 02
Prof. T. Mazurek, MWF 3:30-4:20

4 credit hours

Intermediate Latin

CLLA 20003/60003 01
Prof. C. Schlegel, MWF 12:50-1:40

3 credit hours

CLLA 20003/60003 02
Prof. E. Mazurek, MWF 10:30-11:20

3 credit hours

Ovid's Metamorphoses

CLLA 30095/60095
Prof. E. Mazurek, MWF 12:50-1:40

3 credit hours

In this course, we translate and discuss selected passages from the Metamorphoses, Ovid's idiosyncratic poetic history of the world. Topics for our discussions include the spiritual, moral, religious, political, and physical transformations portrayed between the creation story at the beginning and the deification of Caesar at the end of the text; the tension between Ovid's adherence to Roman traditions and his irreverent, sometimes subversive, artistic originality; the poem's narrative techniques, poetic style, and structure; the significance of intertextual allusions to Greek drama, Virgilian epic, and Ovid's own love poetry; the instability of gender; portraits of the poet within the work; and the innumerable faces of love, as presented through characters who are pious, raging with passion, inseparable, violent, infatuated, lovesick, devoted, and much more. Above all, this course aims at clarifying how Ovid's inexhaustible playfulness and delightful wit contributed to shaping a work of both epic grandeur and lyric intimacy that continues to inspire poets, composers, novelists, painters, and at least one playwright whose version recently made it all the way to Broadway. Daily preparation and active participation in class are essential components of the course; brief written assignments, one mid-term exam, one brief project, and a final exam also count towards the final grade. Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.

Roman Wisdom

CLLA 30105/60105
Prof. M. Bloomer, TR 9:30-10:45

3 credit hours

Romans thought they were wise. Sapientia (wisdom) was understood as better than Greek philosophy. Cicero and others thought of wisdom as a blend of tradition, hard practicality, and good government of the state, of the familia, of one's self. Finally, Greek philosophy had to be accommodated to Roman needs. Who were the Romans' sages and what was their wisdom literature? We shall read Cornelius Nepos' Life of Cato, Cicero's On old age, and consider other sages as well--the old men of comedy, Virgil's Anchises, and Ovid's Pythagoras.

Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics

CLLA 40011/60611
Prof. C. Schlegel, MW 5:05-6:20

3 credit hours

Before Vergil wrote the Aeneid he was famous for his Eclogues ("Selections")--short pastoral poems with embedded political notes--and for his Georgics--a poem in four books ostensibly about agricultural practice but which tells tales from mythology, Roman politics and society, along with instructions on animal husbandry, astronomy, and the manners of Hellenistic poetics. In this course we will read these poems and, while enjoying their stunning poetry, will also be considering how and why Vergil weaves so many ethical and aesthetic themes into his contemplation of work, leisure, and the Italian landscape. The background of the Roman civil wars looms behind the poems. Some acquaintance with the Aeneid (in translation is fine) is recommended.

Medieval Latin Survey

CLLA 40017/60017
Prof. H. Müller, TR 2:00-3:15

3 credit hours

The aim of this course is to experience a broad spectrum of Medieval Latin texts. Readings representative of a variety of genres (literary and subliterary), eras, and regions will be selected. Students planning to enroll in this course should be completing Introduction to Christian Latin Texts or they must secure the permission of the instructor. Those with interests in particular text types should inform the instructor well in advance so that he/she can try to accommodate their interests.

Latin Paleography

CLLA 40118/60118
Prof. D. Gura, M 9:30-12:15

3 credit hours

The course is an intensive survey of Latin scripts from antiquity through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Students will be able to accurately read and transcribe Latin scripts, expand systems of abbreviation, identify, date, and localize (when possible) different hands, and defend their interpretations. There will be a strong emphasis on the different varieties of Gothic script (textualis, cursiva, hybrida). Once the class reaches the twelfth century, students will work extensively with Notre Dame¹s medieval collection of codices and fragments. Note: The Medieval Academy of America's Committee on Centers and Regional Associations (CARA) offers competitive stipends for students taking either Medieval Latin or Latin Paleography for credit through the Medieval Institute at Notre Dame. Application details and eligibility information are available on the Medieval Academy website?: http://www.medievalacademy.org/?page=CARA_Scholarships?

Latin Suvey I: The Birth and Growth of Latin Literature

CLLA 40510/60510
Prof. B. Krostenko, TR 3:30-4:45

3 credit hours

This class offers an overview of Latin literature from its origins in the 3rd century to the late Republic. During this period, as the poet Horace put it, Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit "Captured Greece captured her savage conqueror": Greek literary forms - epic, drama, historiography, and rhetoric - provided the models for literature in Latin. But these adaptations were never simple copies: the values of the Romans' militarist and hierarchical society lie close to the surface. Furthermore, the values of that society were hardly static but themselves developed as Rome grew from a regional power into a world empire. The chief purpose of this class is to grasp the dual identity of Roman literature: what does it owe to the Greek world? and what does it owe to its own developing social world? Additional topics include the history of the Latin morphology and syntax and the development of Latin meters, especially the hexameter. Authors to be read include Plautus, Naevius, Ennius, Terence, Cicero, Lucretius, Caesar, Sallust and Catullus.

Fall 2021

Beginning Latin I and II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001 01/60001 01
Instructor: Prof. T. Mazurek, MWF 10:30-11:20

4 credit hours

CLLA 10001 02/60001 02
Instructor:  Eleanora Celora, MWF 8:20-9:10

4 credit hours

CLLA 10002 01/60002 01
Instructor: Karl Berg, MWF 9:25-10:15

4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10001 or equivalent

CLLA 10002 02/60002 02
Instructor: Ashley Walker, MWF 8:20-9:10

4 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001 or equivalent

Intermediate Latin

CLLA 20003 01/60003 01
Prof. E. Mazurek, MWF 11:30-12:20
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

CLLA 20003 02/60003 02
Prof. E. Mazurek, MWF 2:00-2:50

CLLA 20003 03/60003 03
Prof. T. Mazurek, MWF 12:50-1:40

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

Lucretius

CLLA 30021/60021
Prof. M. Bloomer, TR 9:30-10:45

This advanced course introduces students to Lucretius' epic poem, De rerum natura, whose mission is to free the reader from fear and convention so as to see the world and one's place in it with unclouded eyes. This vision is a poetic re-understanding of Epicurean philosophy. Chief topics include the atomic nature of matter, the mortality of the soul, the vanity of religion, and the importance of achieving intellectual tranquillity.  We shall examine Lucretius’ contribution to Roman intellectual and literary history by reading select passages in his sources (Epicurus, Ennius, Homer, Hesiod) and in the two poets he most influenced, Virgil and Ovid. His importance for the development of scientific method and his influence on English poetry will be considered briefly.
Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.

Intro to Christian Latin

CLLA 40016/60016
Prof. H. Müller, TR 12:30-1:45

This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written.  There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin.  Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD.  While the course’s goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students’ abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency.  Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion’s share of homework.  Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.

Roman Rhetoric

CLLA 40024/60024
Prof. M. Bloomer, TR 2:00-3:15

This advanced course introduces students to Roman writings on rhetoric, the science and practice of persuasive speech. Roman theorists of rhetoric understood the state as a community of speech to be led by a great orator. In practice, rhetoric was the chief component of the educational curriculum and the basis for written and much spoken communication. We shall read selections from the Rhetorica ad Herennium, Cicero, the elder Seneca, Quintilian, and Tacitus. We shall also consider the ongoing history of classical rhetoric--its influence on theorists of language, communication, and power.
Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.

The History of Latin

CLLA 40056/60056
Prof. B. Krostenko, TR 11:00-12:15

This course will examine the phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and stylistic development of the Latin language from Proto-Italic to early medieval Latin. Analysis of sample texts will alternate with discussion of relevant topics, which will include the principles of historical and comparative linguistics, Latin and its sister languages, the creation of the Latin inflectional system, the varieties of classical Latin, the development of Latin poetics and metrics, and the influence of Greek on Latin.
Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.

Western Codicology

CLLA 60120/MI 60007
Prof. D. Gura, MW 12:45-2:00

This course will train students in the forensic approaches to the medieval manuscript book as a physical artifact. Students will learn to collect and interpret codicological data (e.g., collation, layout, decoration, distribution of scribal labor, book bindings, provenance, etc.). These skills will culminate in the ability to generate analytical manuscript descriptions and to integrate them into a larger research program. Specific treatment will be given to problematic genres of manuscripts such as Bibles, liturgical and music manuscripts, calendars, books of hours, legal texts, and fragments. In addition to the acquisition of codicological skills, students will learn to identify texts and develop a command of the secondary resources and bibliographic reference materials essential to the critical study of manuscripts. Students will work extensively with the medieval manuscripts in the collections of the Hesburgh Library and acquire plenty of hands­-on experience. Pre­requisites: Students must be proficient in Latin; a previous course in Latin paleography is not required, but recommended.

 

Winter Session 2021

Slide to the Next Latin Level

This course is designed to help students to take advanced Latin courses in the spring. We will focus on original readings from Livy and Younger Pliny and learn about the mythical foundation of Rome, the war against Hannibal, the eruption of mount Vesuvius and the Roman persecutions of Christians. Class time will be devoted to translating together assigned Latin readings, commenting on matters of style, literature and history, and practicing some sight translation. 2 credits, fifteen classes of 75 minutes, two review sessions and a final exam. No book required, all material will be provided by the instructor. 

CLLA 20001/60201
Professor L. Grillo, MTWRF 7:30-8:45pm (via Zoom)
2 credit hours 

Spring 2021

Beginning Latin I and II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Instructor: TBA, MWF 8:00-8:50
4 credit hours

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Instructor: TBA, MWF 10:25-11:15
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Beginning Latin I

CLLA 10002/60002 02
Instructor: TBA, MWF 11:40-12:30
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Beginning Latin I

Intermediate Latin

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

CLLA 20003/60003 01
Prof. T. Mazurek, MWF 2:30-3:20
3 credit hours

CLLA 20003/60003 02
Prof. C. Schlegel, MWF 9:10-10:00
3 credit hours

Reading and Writing Latin Prose

CLLA 30004/60004
Prof. B. Krostenko, TR 11:10-12:25
3 credit hours

This course reviews major topics in Latin syntax, which students practice through compositions and specially designed, targeted readings, to the end of learning to group syntactic phenomena in sets, the fundament of quick and accurate reading.  The course also introduces students to stylistic analysis and historical syntax and semantics through a survey of exemplary texts from various stages of Latin literary history.

Virgil

CLLA 30011/60011
Prof. E. Mazurek, TR 3:55-5:10
3 credit hours

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
This third-year course on the Aeneid, Virgil’s literary masterpiece written in Rome in the last decades of the first century BC, aims to develop students’ skills in: translating Latin poetry; reading aloud and analyzing Latin hexameters; analyzing Latin poetic style; interpreting classical epic poetry.  Class will consist primarily of close study of assigned passages from the Latin text of the poem.  Students will also read the entire poem in English translation and consider its cultural and historical context.  The course prepares students for advanced study in Latin language and literature.

Medieval Latin Survey: School Books and Education in the Middle Ages.

CLLA 40017/60017
Prof. M. Bloomer, TR 2:20-3:35
3 credit hours

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
This course offers an introduction to the vast fields of medieval Latin and medieval Latin literature by beginning where medieval authors and readers began, in the schoolroom, and it will offer an introduction to the developing digital tools and methods of editing and researching these texts. We will read the chief texts studied in the schools of the middle ages. We will consider the ways these texts were taught and learned by examining the commentaries that came to accompany these texts and by investigating the manuscript forms of the texts.

Our Latin readings will begin with the early reading curriculum, especially the Distichs of Cato, the Fables of Avianus, and the Eclogues of Theodulus along with some of their prose paraphrases and commentaries. We will also touch upon the chief texts of grammatical instruction (beginning with Donatus) and some notices of educational program (Dialogus ad auctores, Alcuin, John of Salisbury, Erasmus, Colloquies).

Latin Paleography

CLLA 40118
Prof. D. Gura, T 9:35-12:20
3 credit hours

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
Although paleography, study of the history of letter-forms, has been called "a science of the very small," it equips philologists with otherwise unavailable resources for their studies, it furnishes historians of culture and the arts with abundant new data and comparanda, and it is a source of delight to anyone who loves books and calligraphy. This course is an introduction: it will provide an overview of the history of Latin letters and writing from the first century BC through the 15th century AD considered as products of the cultures that produced them; special attention will be given to developing facility in reading the principal script types used for the transmission of texts (bookhands) and in transcribing and editing texts so transmitted; but students will also develop a good acquaintance upon which future study can be based with the more obscure script types, display scripts, and letter forms employed on coins, inscriptions, and seals.

Augustine: A Survey of his Life and Writings

CLLA 40344/60344
Prof. H. Müller, TR 9:35-10:50
3 credit hours

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
In this course, we will explore the multifaceted life and legacy of Augustine of Hippo, greatest of the Latin Church Fathers. As a saint, a thinker and a writer, Augustine has deeply shaped the Western world (not only the Catholic Church). We will read a widespread array of selections from Augustine’s best-known works (Confessions, City of God), but also from his sermons, letters and theological treatises. We will take a look at Augustine’s exegesis and preaching, at the religious controversies in which he was involved, and at his role as a leader of the African Church. We will situate Augustine’s works within the framework of classical culture, late ancient politics and the early Christian Church, and discuss their enduring influence.

Latin Survey II: Roman Literary Culture in the Early Empire 

CLLA 60520 (40520 by permission)
Prof. L. Grillo, MW 12:45-2:00
3 credit hours

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
This survey of Latin literature from the end of the republic through the mid empire traces the development of the major genres and literary movements in “Silver” Latin. We shall read in Latin selections from the Augustan poets, the historians of the empire, the tragedies and philosophical works of Seneca, Petronius, the epic poets Statius’ and later lyric, and a few late Latin works. Additional readings will include other Roman and Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important modern studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Latin literature.

Fall 2020

Beginning Latin I and II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001 01/60001
Instructor: TBA

4 credit hours

CLLA 10001 02/60001 02
Instructor:  TBA

4 credit hours

CLLA 10002 01/60002
Instructor: TBA

4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10001 or equivalent

CLLA 10002 02/60002
Instructor: TBA

4 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001 or equivalent

Intermediate Latin

CLLA 20003 01/60003 01
TBA
3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

CLLA 20003 02/60003 02
Prof. E. Mazurek

CLLA 20003 03/60003 03
Prof. T. Mazurek

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

Roman Lyric Poetry

CLLA 30013/60013
Prof. C. Schlegel

3 credit hours

(Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.) This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003 (Intermediate Latin) and CLLA 20004 (Reading and Writing Latin Prose), and offers close reading of passages from the lyric poetry of such authors as Catullus and Horace. The lyric form gives precise and economical expression to a wide range of human thoughts and emotions, from the highly personal to the grandly patriotic. The range of Roman lyric, the technique of its practitioners, and the place of lyric poetry in Roman life are themes that receive special attention. This course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature, especially CLLA 40023 (Roman Elegiac Poetry), CLLA 40033 (Roman Satire), CLLA 40043 (Roman Comedy), and CLLA 40053 (Roman Tragedy).

Intro to Christian Latin Texts

CLLA 40016 01/60016 (Cross-listed with MI 40003/60003, THEO 30004/60001, LIT 73677)
Prof. H. Müller

3 credit hours
Prerequisite:  Third year Latin

This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written. There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin. Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD. While the course's goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students' abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency. Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion's share of homework. Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.

Latin Letters

CLLA 40039/60039
Prof. L. Grillo

3 credit hours

This advanced course in Latin prose literature examines the Roman epistolary tradition. Focusing on the letters of the younger Pliny, it studies them first as a self-conscious portrait for posterity of a prominent Roman senator of the early Antonine age, and second as a set of documents that reveal features of Roman social, political, economic and cultural life. In addition to Pliny's letters, students will read selections from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Augustine or Jerome. Close attention will be given to the different prose styles of each author and his innovations within the genre.

 

Spring 2020

Beginning Latin I

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Maria Ma
MWF 9:25-10:15

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

Beginning Latin II

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Melody Wauke
MWF 11:30-12:20

CLLA 10002/60002 02
TBD
MWF 8:20-9:10

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

Intermediate Latin

CLLA 20003/60003 01
E. Mazurek
MWF 10:30-11:20

CLLA 20003/60003 02
T. Mazurek
MWF 11:30-12:20

CLLA 20003/60003 03
C. Schlegel
MWF 3:30-4:45

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

Latin History Writing

CLLA 30012
E. Mazurek
MW 2:00-2:50

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003 and CLLA 20004, and offers close reading of passages from the works of the historical writers Livy and Tacitus.  Latin historiography is a sophisticated instrument for narrating past events, for showing how notions of cause and effect and change over time develop in historical thinking, and for indicating the relevance of the past to the present.  The political and social conditions of Rome that informed the writings of Livy and Tacitus are discussed, and the compositional techniques of their works are examined.  The course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature, especially CLLA 40022, CLLA 40032, and CLLA 40052.  Offered in spring semester, alternate years.

 

Medieval Latin Survey

CLLA 40017
G. Müller
TR 12:30-1:45

The aim of this course is to experience a broad spectrum of Medieval Latin texts.  Readings representative of a variety of genres (literary and subliterary), eras, and regions will be selected.  Students planning to enroll in this course should be completing Introduction to Christian Latin Texts or they must secure the permission of the instructor.  Those with interests in particular text types should inform the instructor well in advance so that she can try to accommodate their interests.

 

Roman Satire

CLLA 40033
C. Schlegel
MW 11:00-12:15

This advanced course introduces students to the genre of satire, a distinctively Roman poetry in which writers express their first-person reflections on contemporary life and morals. Readings from such authors as Lucilius, Horace, and Juvenal reveal a wide range of poetic temperaments and preoccupations that may be mild, fierce, comic, political, philosophical, crude, or refined, but always solidly embedded in their Roman milieu. The relationship between satiric poetry and its social, cultural, and political context is crucial. (Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills)

 

Latin Survey I: The Birth and Growth of Latin Literature

CLLA 40510/60510: Latin Survey I
M. Bloomer
TR 2:00-3:15

This class offers an overview of Latin literature from its origins in the 3rd century to the late Republic.  During this period, as the poet Horace put it, Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit “Captured Greece captured her savage conqueror”: Greek literary forms–epic, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric–provided the models for literature in Latin.  But these adaptations were never simple copies: the values of the Romans’ militarist society lie close to the surface.  Furthermore the values of that society were hardly static but themselves developed as Rome grew from a regional power into a world empire.  The chief purpose of this class is to grasp the dual identity of Roman literature: what does it owe to the Greek world? And what does it owe to its own developing social world?  Additional topics include the formal development of the Latin language; the development of Latin meters, especially the hexameter; and native Italic literary forms (e.g. farces and Saturnian epitaphs).  Authors to be read include Plautus, Naevius, Ennius, Terence, Lucilius, Cicero, Lucretius, Caesar, Sallust and Catullus.

Fall 2019 Courses

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Instructor: Kelsi Ray

CLLA 10001/60001 02
Prof. T. Mazurek

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Instuctor: Hannah Vansyckel

CLLA 10002/60002 02
Instructor: Melody Wauke

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

Intermediate Latin

CLLA 20003/60003 01
Prof. H. Muller

CLLA 20003/60003 02
Prof. D. Hernandez

CLLA 20003/60003 03
Prof. M. Bloomer

Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent.
This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered every semester.

Age of Nero

CLLA 30025/60025
Prof. E. Mazurek

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent. 
In this third-year Latin course, students will study the history and culture of the reign of Nero (AD 54-68), the last of the Julio-Claudian emperors and one of the most notorious figures in all of Roman history.  Readings will focus on:  1) the philosophical writings of Seneca the Younger, Nero’s tutor and political advisor; 2) the picaresque novel Satyricon by Petronius, a member of Nero’s court; 3) the historical account of Nero’s political downfall, including his persecution of the Christians, in Tacitus’ Annals.  In the process, students will strengthen their skills in translation of Latin prose, analysis of Latin prose style, and interpretation of Roman literature and culture.  This course ultimately prepares students for advanced study in Latin prose literature.

Ovid's Metamorphoses 

CLLA 30095/60095
Prof. M. Bloomer

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
In this course, we translate and discuss selected passages from the Metamorphoses, Ovid's idiosyncratic poetic history of the world. Topics for our discussions include the spiritual, moral, religious, political, and physical transformations portrayed between the creation story at the beginning and the deification of Caesar at the end of the text; the tension between Ovid's adherence to Roman traditions and his irreverent, sometimes subversive, artistic originality; the poem's narrative techniques, poetic style, and structure; the significance of intertextual allusions to Greek drama, Virgilian epic, and Ovid's own love poetry; the instability of gender; portraits of the poet within the work; and the innumerable faces of love, as presented through characters who are pious, raging with passion, inseparable, violent, infatuated, lovesick, devoted, and much more. Above all, this course aims at clarifying how Ovid's inexhaustible playfulness and delightful wit contributed to shaping a work of both epic grandeur and lyric intimacy that continues to inspire poets, composers, novelists, painters, and at least one playwright whose version recently made it all the way to Broadway. Daily preparation and active participation in class are essential components of the course; brief written assignments, one mid-term exam, one brief project, and a final exam also count towards the final grade.

Intro to Christian Latin Texts

CLLA 40016/60016 01 (Cross-listed with MI 40003/60003, THEO 30004/60001, LIT 73677)
Prof. H. Muller

Prerequisite: Third year Latin
This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written. There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin. Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD. While the course's goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students' abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency. Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion's share of homework. Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.

 

Spring 2019 Courses

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II
 

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Instructor TBA
MWF 9:25-10:15

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Prof. R. Ford
MWF 11:30-12:20

CLLA 10002/60002 02
Prof. E. Mazurek 
MWF 2:00-2:50

Prerequisite for CLLA 10002:  CLLA 10001
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. 

Intermediate Latin                                                                   

CLLA 20003/60003 01
Prof. C. Schlegel
TR 9:30-10:45

CLLA 20003/60003 02
Prof. T. Mazurek 
MWF 2:00-2:50

Prerequisite: CLLA 10002 or equivalent.
This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

Vergil

CLLA 30011/60011
Prof. E. Mazurek
MWF 11:30-12:20

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.

This third-year course on the Aeneid, Virgil’s literary masterpiece written in Rome in the last decades of the first century BC, aims to develop students’ skills in: translating Latin poetry; reading aloud and analyzing Latin hexameters; analyzing Latin poetic style; interpreting classical epic poetry.  Class will consist primarily of close study of assigned passages from the Latin text of the poem.  Students will also read the entire poem in English translation and consider its cultural and historical context.  The course prepares students for advanced study in Latin language and literature.

 

Cicero’s Speeches

CLLA 30014/60014
Prof. B. Krostenko
MW 2:00-3:15

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–44 BC) was the most accomplished orator of the Roman Republic. This course offers close reading of select speeches of Cicero.  The art of persuasion was an essential requirement for success in Roman public life, and no one was more persuasive than Cicero. The flexibility and complexity of Cicero's grammatical expression, the range of his styles, and the political contexts in which his speeches were delivered are all  given careful treatment.  [In 2019 the course will focus especially on the three speeches that Cicero delivered to Julius Caesar near the end of both their lives—the pro rege Deiotaro, pro Marcello, and pro Ligario.  In these speeches Cicero bends the techniques he had long honed to sway juries and crowds to influence the policy decisions of the man who was Rome's dictator and sole master.  The class will consider questions like: what do Cicero's techniques owe to his earlier speeches and other Roman literature?  How does oratory change under a dictatorship?  What does moral integrity mean in a rhetorical culture?  Supplementary texts, both in Latin and in English, will be taken from other speeches of Cicero, his private letters, and philosophical dialogues.

Seneca and Stoicism

CLLA 30034/60034
Prof. C. Schlegel
TR 2:00-3:15

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to Seneca's philosophical and dramatic works. Seneca was a Stoic, subscribing to a philosophy that emphasized such virtues as self-control and self-sufficiency, for which many upper-class Romans had high regard. Readings will include selections from Seneca's epistles, essays, and tragedies. Students will examine how Seneca understood the workings of the soul, and how he developed practical strategies for psychological self-management. 

A History of the Greek and Latin Fable

CLLA 40019/60019
Prof. M. Bloomer
MW 9:30-10:45

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
A history of the Greek and Latin fable. This class requires either intermediate Greek or intermediate Latin. In special cases upon consultation with Prof. Bloomer a student interested in the French, Italian, German or English traditions may focus on one of those (early) vernacular traditions. Students should have proficiency then in one language. We shall begin with the origins of the fable in the Near East and the transmission to Greece, and focus more on the transformation of this subliterary form through ancient schooling into a literary genre, in a number of its strange twists. The poet Babrius and the anonymous prose Life of Aesop will be the principal Greek texts. The fables of Phaedrus, Avianus, and later medieval prose and verse versions will be the chief Latin texts. We will consider as well (in English translation)the medieval fortunes of the fables in France and England, chiefly Marie de Frances's Fables and Henryson's Moral Fables and Reynard the Fox. Some attention will be given to the history of booking and illustrating the fables. For Medieval Institute students this course may be taken as the medieval Latin seminar.

Latin Survey II: Roman Literary Culture in the Early Empire 

CLLA 60520/40520
Prof. L. Grillo
TR 3:30-4:45

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
This survey of Latin literature from the end of the republic through the mid empire traces the development of the major genres and literary movements in “Silver” Latin. We shall read in Latin selections from the Augustan poets, the historians of the empire, the tragedies and philosophical works of Seneca, Petronius, the epic poets Statius’ and later lyric, and a few late Latin works. Additional readings will include other Roman and Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important modern studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Latin literature.

 

Fall 2018 Courses

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II

CLLA 10001-10002
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001 01/60001Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 1)
Instructor:  TBA

MWF 8:20-9:10, 4 credit hours

CLLA 10001 02/60001

Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 2)

Instructor:  TBA

MWF 12:50-1:40, 4 credit hours

 

CLLA 10002 01/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001 or equivalent

 

CLLA 10002 02/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

Prof. R. Ford

MWF 12:50-1:40, 4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001 or equivalent

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

CLLA 20003 01/60003

Prof. H. Müller

MWF 9:25-10:15, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

CLLA 20003 02/60003

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 3)

CLLA 20003 03/60003

Prof. C. Schlegel

TR 9:30-1:45, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 
Reading and Writing Latin Prose

CLLA 30004/60004

Prof. B. Krostenko

TR 12:30-1:45, 3 credit hours

This course reviews major topics in Latin syntax, which students practice through compositions and specially designed, targeted readings, to the end of learning to group syntactic phenomena in sets, the fundament of quick and accurate reading.  The course also introduces students to stylistic analysis and historical syntax and semantics through a survey of exemplary texts from various stages of Latin literary history.

 

 
Roman Lyric Poetry

CLLA 30013/60013

Prof. M. Bloomer

TR 9:30-10:45, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 20004

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003 and CLLA 20004, and offers close reading of passages from the lyric poetry of such authors as Catullus and Horace.  The lyric form gives precise and economical expression to a wide range of human thoughts and emotions, from the highly personal to the grandly patriotic.  The range of Roman lyric, the technique of its practitioners, and the place of lyric poetry in Roman life are themes that receive special attention.  This course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature, especially CLLA 40023, CLLA 40033, CLLA 40043, and CLLA 40053.  Offered in fall semester, alternate years.

 

 
Intro to Christian Latin Texts

CLLA 40016 01/60016 (Cross-listed with MI 40003/60003, THEO 30004/60001, LIT 73677)

Prof. H. Müller

MW 2:00-3:15, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Third year Latin

This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written. There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin. Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD. While the course's goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students' abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency. Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion's share of homework. Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.

Spring 2018 Courses
 

Beginning Latin I

CLLA 10001/60001 01

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 9:25-10:15, 4 credits

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

 

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

CLLA 10002/60002 01

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 11:30-12:20, 4 credits

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

 

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

CLLA 10002/60002 02

TBA

MWF 8:20-9:10, 4 credits

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

CLLA 20003/60003 01

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 3 credits

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

CLLA 20003/60003 02

Prof. G. Müller

MWF 3:30-4:20, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002/60002 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

 

Latin History-Writing

CLLA 30012

Prof. E. Mazurek

MW 9:30-10:45, 3 credits

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003, and offers close reading of passages from the works of Livy and Tacitus, specifically, Livy’s account of the Second Punic War and Tacitus’ Agricola.  We will be looking carefully at Livy’s portraits of Hannibal and Scipio Africanus, written in the Augustan era, and Tacitus’ portrait of his father-in-law Agricola, written later in the Flavian era, in order to understand Roman concepts of leadership and how these change over time.  We will also examine trends in Roman historiography more generally, including the political and social conditions in Rome that informed historical writing as well as the literary hallmarks of the genre.  The course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature.  

 

 

Elegaic Roman Poetry

CLLA 40023

Prof. K. Schlegel

MW 3:30-4:45, 3 credits

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills

This advanced course introduces students to Latin elegy, a form of verse that served Roman poets as a vehicle for expressing and exploring personal feelings, especially those associated with love. Readings from Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid expose how Roman poets adapted and experimented with the elegiac form to express highly charged personal emotions often at odds with conventional Roman values.

 

 

The Digital Schoolbook

CLLA 43098

Prof. M. Bloomer

TR 9:30-10:45, 3 credits
The Digital Schoolbook seminar examines the history of educational practice as it can be deduced from extant materials. In brief we will plunge into the many texts, issues, and schoolings that brought liberal education to and through the Middle Ages and into the theoretical considerations in educational (cultural and intellectual) history. In addition to training in the relevant archival, historical, and textual methods, the seminar will introduce foundational skills  and theory of digital humanities. Dr. F. Fischer of the Cologne Center for eHumanities will join us in February for intensive instruction in digital scholarship and especially digital editing. Students will be introduced to TEI and to the range of issues in planning, designing, and implementing a collaborative DH research project. Finally, given interest, students may develop projects suitable for internships at the CCeH.

 

 

Latin Survey I: The Birth and Growth of Latin Literature

CLLA 40510/60510
Prof. B. Krostenko

TR 2:00-3:15, 3 credits
This class offers an overview of Latin literature from its origins in the 3rd century to the late Republic.  During this period, as the poet Horace put it, Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit “Captured Greece captured her savage conqueror”: Greek literary forms--epic, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric--provided the models for literature in Latin.  But these adaptations were never simple copies: the values of the Romans’ militarist society lie close to the surface.  Furthermore the values of that society were hardly static but themselves developed as Rome grew from a regional power into a world empire.  The chief purpose of this class is to grasp the dual identity of Roman literature: what does it owe to the Greek world? And what does it owe to its own developing social world?  Additional topics include the formal development of the Latin language; the development of Latin meters, especially the hexameter; and native Italic literary forms (e.g. farces and Saturnian epitaphs).  Authors to be read include Plautus, Naevius, Ennius, Terence, Lucilius, Cicero, Lucretius, Caesar, Sallust and Catullus.