Latin Language and Literature

Spring 2019 Courses

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II
 

CLLA 10001/60001 01
Instructor TBA
MWF 9:25-10:15

CLLA 10002/60002 01
Prof. R. Ford
MWF 11:30-12:20

CLLA 10002/60002 02
Prof. E. Mazurek 
MWF 2:00-2:50

Prerequisite for CLLA 10002:  CLLA 10001
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion. 

Intermediate Latin                                                                   

CLLA 20003/60003 01
Prof. C. Schlegel
TR 9:30-10:45

CLLA 20003/60003 02
Prof. T. Mazurek 
MWF 2:00-2:50

Prerequisite: CLLA 10002 or equivalent.
This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

Vergil

CLLA 30011/60011
Prof. E. Mazurek
MWF 11:30-12:20

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.

This third-year course on the Aeneid, Virgil’s literary masterpiece written in Rome in the last decades of the first century BC, aims to develop students’ skills in: translating Latin poetry; reading aloud and analyzing Latin hexameters; analyzing Latin poetic style; interpreting classical epic poetry.  Class will consist primarily of close study of assigned passages from the Latin text of the poem.  Students will also read the entire poem in English translation and consider its cultural and historical context.  The course prepares students for advanced study in Latin language and literature.

 

Cicero’s Speeches

CLLA 30014/60014
Prof. B. Krostenko
MW 2:00-3:15

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–44 BC) was the most accomplished orator of the Roman Republic. This course offers close reading of select speeches of Cicero.  The art of persuasion was an essential requirement for success in Roman public life, and no one was more persuasive than Cicero. The flexibility and complexity of Cicero's grammatical expression, the range of his styles, and the political contexts in which his speeches were delivered are all  given careful treatment.  [In 2019 the course will focus especially on the three speeches that Cicero delivered to Julius Caesar near the end of both their lives—the pro rege Deiotaro, pro Marcello, and pro Ligario.  In these speeches Cicero bends the techniques he had long honed to sway juries and crowds to influence the policy decisions of the man who was Rome's dictator and sole master.  The class will consider questions like: what do Cicero's techniques owe to his earlier speeches and other Roman literature?  How does oratory change under a dictatorship?  What does moral integrity mean in a rhetorical culture?  Supplementary texts, both in Latin and in English, will be taken from other speeches of Cicero, his private letters, and philosophical dialogues.

Seneca and Stoicism

CLLA 30034/60034
Prof. C. Schlegel
TR 2:00-3:15

Recommended for students who have completed CLLA 20003 or equivalent.
This course provides an introduction to Seneca's philosophical and dramatic works. Seneca was a Stoic, subscribing to a philosophy that emphasized such virtues as self-control and self-sufficiency, for which many upper-class Romans had high regard. Readings will include selections from Seneca's epistles, essays, and tragedies. Students will examine how Seneca understood the workings of the soul, and how he developed practical strategies for psychological self-management. 

A History of the Greek and Latin Fable

CLLA 40019/60019
Prof. M. Bloomer
MW 9:30-10:45

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
A history of the Greek and Latin fable. This class requires either intermediate Greek or intermediate Latin. In special cases upon consultation with Prof. Bloomer a student interested in the French, Italian, German or English traditions may focus on one of those (early) vernacular traditions. Students should have proficiency then in one language. We shall begin with the origins of the fable in the Near East and the transmission to Greece, and focus more on the transformation of this subliterary form through ancient schooling into a literary genre, in a number of its strange twists. The poet Babrius and the anonymous prose Life of Aesop will be the principal Greek texts. The fables of Phaedrus, Avianus, and later medieval prose and verse versions will be the chief Latin texts. We will consider as well (in English translation)the medieval fortunes of the fables in France and England, chiefly Marie de Frances's Fables and Henryson's Moral Fables and Reynard the Fox. Some attention will be given to the history of booking and illustrating the fables. For Medieval Institute students this course may be taken as the medieval Latin seminar.

Latin Survey II: Roman Literary Culture in the Early Empire 

CLLA 60520/40520
Prof. L. Grillo
TR 3:30-4:45

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills.
This survey of Latin literature from the end of the republic through the mid empire traces the development of the major genres and literary movements in “Silver” Latin. We shall read in Latin selections from the Augustan poets, the historians of the empire, the tragedies and philosophical works of Seneca, Petronius, the epic poets Statius’ and later lyric, and a few late Latin works. Additional readings will include other Roman and Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important modern studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Latin literature.

 

Fall 2018 Courses

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II

CLLA 10001-10002
This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001 01/60001Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 1)
Instructor:  TBA

MWF 8:20-9:10, 4 credit hours

CLLA 10001 02/60001

Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 2)

Instructor:  TBA

MWF 12:50-1:40, 4 credit hours

 

CLLA 10002 01/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001 or equivalent

 

CLLA 10002 02/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

Prof. R. Ford

MWF 12:50-1:40, 4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001 or equivalent

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

CLLA 20003 01/60003

Prof. H. Müller

MWF 9:25-10:15, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

CLLA 20003 02/60003

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 3)

CLLA 20003 03/60003

Prof. C. Schlegel

TR 9:30-1:45, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 
Reading and Writing Latin Prose

CLLA 30004/60004

Prof. B. Krostenko

TR 12:30-1:45, 3 credit hours

This course reviews major topics in Latin syntax, which students practice through compo-sitions and specially designed, targeted readings, to the end of learning to group syntactic phenomena in sets, the fundament of quick and accurate reading.  The course also introduces students to stylistic analysis and historical syntax and semantics through a survey of exemplary texts from various stages of Latin literary history.

 

 
Roman Lyric Poetry

CLLA 30013/60013

Prof. M. Bloomer

TR 9:30-10:45, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CLLA 20004

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003 and CLLA 20004, and offers close reading of passages from the lyric poetry of such authors as Catullus and Horace.  The lyric form gives precise and economical expression to a wide range of human thoughts and emotions, from the highly personal to the grandly patriotic.  The range of Roman lyric, the technique of its practitioners, and the place of lyric poetry in Roman life are themes that receive special attention.  This course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature, especially CLLA 40023, CLLA 40033, CLLA 40043, and CLLA 40053.  Offered in fall semester, alternate years.

 

 
Intro to Christian Latin Texts

CLLA 40016 01/60016 (Cross-listed with MI 40003/60003, THEO 30004/60001, LIT 73677)

Prof. H. Müller

MW 2:00-3:15, 3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Third year Latin

This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written. There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin. Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD. While the course's goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students' abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency. Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion's share of homework. Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.

Spring 2018 Courses
 

Beginning Latin I

CLLA 10001/60001 01

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 9:25-10:15, 4 credits

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

 

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

CLLA 10002/60002 01

Prof. T. Mazurek

MWF 11:30-12:20, 4 credits

Prerequisite: CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

 

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

CLLA 10002/60002 02

TBA

MWF 8:20-9:10, 4 credits

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

CLLA 20003/60003 01

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 2:00-2:50, 3 credits

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

 

 

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

CLLA 20003/60003 02

Prof. G. Müller

MWF 3:30-4:20, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002/60002 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

 

Latin History-Writing

CLLA 30012

Prof. E. Mazurek

MW 9:30-10:45, 3 credits

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003, and offers close reading of passages from the works of Livy and Tacitus, specifically, Livy’s account of the Second Punic War and Tacitus’ Agricola.  We will be looking carefully at Livy’s portraits of Hannibal and Scipio Africanus, written in the Augustan era, and Tacitus’ portrait of his father-in-law Agricola, written later in the Flavian era, in order to understand Roman concepts of leadership and how these change over time.  We will also examine trends in Roman historiography more generally, including the political and social conditions in Rome that informed historical writing as well as the literary hallmarks of the genre.  The course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature.  

 

 

Elegaic Roman Poetry

CLLA 40023

Prof. K. Schlegel

MW 3:30-4:45, 3 credits

Recommended for students with advanced Latin skills

This advanced course introduces students to Latin elegy, a form of verse that served Roman poets as a vehicle for expressing and exploring personal feelings, especially those associated with love. Readings from Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid expose how Roman poets adapted and experimented with the elegiac form to express highly charged personal emotions often at odds with conventional Roman values.

 

 

The Digital Schoolbook

CLLA 43098

Prof. M. Bloomer

TR 9:30-10:45, 3 credits
The Digital Schoolbook seminar examines the history of educational practice as it can be deduced from extant materials. In brief we will plunge into the many texts, issues, and schoolings that brought liberal education to and through the Middle Ages and into the theoretical considerations in educational (cultural and intellectual) history. In addition to training in the relevant archival, historical, and textual methods, the seminar will introduce foundational skills  and theory of digital humanities. Dr. F. Fischer of the Cologne Center for eHumanities will join us in February for intensive instruction in digital scholarship and especially digital editing. Students will be introduced to TEI and to the range of issues in planning, designing, and implementing a collaborative DH research project. Finally, given interest, students may develop projects suitable for internships at the CCeH.

 

 

Latin Survey I: The Birth and Growth of Latin Literature

CLLA 40510/60510
Prof. B. Krostenko

TR 2:00-3:15, 3 credits
This class offers an overview of Latin literature from its origins in the 3rd century to the late Republic.  During this period, as the poet Horace put it, Graecia capta ferum victorem cepit “Captured Greece captured her savage conqueror”: Greek literary forms--epic, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric--provided the models for literature in Latin.  But these adaptations were never simple copies: the values of the Romans’ militarist society lie close to the surface.  Furthermore the values of that society were hardly static but themselves developed as Rome grew from a regional power into a world empire.  The chief purpose of this class is to grasp the dual identity of Roman literature: what does it owe to the Greek world? And what does it owe to its own developing social world?  Additional topics include the formal development of the Latin language; the development of Latin meters, especially the hexameter; and native Italic literary forms (e.g. farces and Saturnian epitaphs).  Authors to be read include Plautus, Naevius, Ennius, Terence, Lucilius, Cicero, Lucretius, Caesar, Sallust and Catullus.