Latin Language and Literature

Spring 2017 Courses

CLLA 10001/60001 01

Beginning Latin I

MWF 9:25 - 10:15, 4 credits

 

CLLA 10002/60002 01

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)

MW 11:00 - 12:15 and F 11:30 - 12:20, 4 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001/60001 Beginning Latin I

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

 

CLLA 10002/60002 02

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)

MW 9:30 - 10:45 and F 9:25 - 10:15, 4 credits

 

CLLA 20003/60003 01

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)

Prof. E. Mazurek

MWF 12:50 - 1:40, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002/60002 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans.

 

CLLA 20003/60003 02

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)

Prof. D. Hernandez

MWF 10:30 - 11:20, 3 credits

 

CLLA 30016

Cicero and the Crisis of the Roman Republic

Prof. B. Krostenko

MW 2:00 - 3:15, 3 credits

The last years of the Roman Republic were years of great political and social disruption—political realignments, constitutional crises, and armed rebellion.  The speeches, letters, and philosophy of Marcus Tullius Cicero give a vivid picture of the issues and values at stake.  The purpose of this class is to understand Cicero's perspective on those values and issues and his role in the debate over them.  What were the structural problems of the late Republic?  How did Cicero approach them?  What was the role of rhetoric in molding that approach?  Texts to be considered include selections from the Verrines, speeches Cicero delivered against a corrupt governor; the Catilinarians, Cicero's attempt to rally support against an insurrectionist; the Caesarian speeches, where Cicero tries to fashion a voice to talk to Caesar, now dictator; and the Philippics, Cicero's attacks on Mark Antony and his last attempt to champion the Republic.  Selections from Cicero's letters and relevant philosophical works will be included, as well as from the historical accounts of Sallust, Caesar, and Asconius and the poetry of Catullus.  At least selections from these works will be read in Latin with the remainder in English.

 

CLLA 40011/60011

Vergil, Ecologues & Georgics

Prof. C. Schlegel

TR 2:00 - 3:15, 3 credits

Before Vergil wrote the Aeneid he was famous for his Eclogues (“Selections”) — short pastoral poems with embedded political notes — and for his Georgics — a poem in four books ostensibly about agricultural practice but which tells tales from mythology, Roman politics and society, along with instructions on animal husbandry, astronomy, and the manners of Hellenistic poetics.  In this course we will read these poems and, while enjoying their stunning poetry, will also be considering how and why Vergil weaves so many ethical and aesthetic themes into his contemplation of work, leisure, and the Italian landscape.  The background of the Roman civil wars looms behind the poems.  Some acquaintance with the Aeneid (in translation is fine) is recommended.

 

CLLA 40017/60017 01 (Cross-list MI 40632/60632 and LIT 73629)

Medieval Latin Survey

Prof. G. Müller

MW 9:30 - 10:45, 3 credits

Prerequisite:  CLLA 40016 or instructor's permission

This course offers an advanced introduction to the vast field of Medieval Latin literature. We shall study a few core texts and see how medieval theological, philosophical, and literary thinkers interpreted, revised, and reacted to the presence and pressure of the auctores (the classical authors who were also authorities in several senses.)  We shall look in detail at medieval commentaries and at medieval literary works inspired by or correcting the old texts.  Techniques of medieval philology, paleography, literary history, and literary criticism will be introduced and practiced.  Students planning to enroll in this course should be completing introduction to Christian Latin Texts or they must secure the permission of the instructor.

 

CLLA 40118/60118 (Cross-list MI 60005)

Latin Paleography

Prof. D. Gura

T 9:30 - 12:15, 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the study of writing materials, practices, and Latin scripts from antiquity to the early Renaissance. It is designed both to introduce students to the history and scholarship of developments in Latin scripts and to provide students with the necessary skills and knowledge to begin to transcribe and describe medieval Latin scripts independently in their own research. Students will: learn about developments in medieval Latin scripts across regions and contemporary scholarship in paleography; learn the principals and practice of scribal abbreviations practice the accurate transcription of representative selection of scripts from manuscripts from across the period learn about scribal practices and materials, and experiment in the reproduction of letter forms; learn to describe accurately the characteristics of a script and of a hand; gain confidence in carefully attributing a date and (where possible) an origin to examples of various scripts; learn and practice the fundamental requirements of manuscript description;and be introduced to printed and online reference tools and current literature for the study of Latin paleography. Once per week the class will provide hands-on experience in one of the following three collections at or in proximity to Notre Dame: 1) Hesburgh Library, Rare Books and Special Collections; 2) The Frank M. Folsom Microfilm and Photographic Collection including microfilms of over 10000 medieval and renaissance manuscripts from the Biblioteca Ambrosiana (Milan); 3) Manuscript Collection of the Newberry Library (Chicago). Prerequisite: Working knowledge of Latin, at least recent completion of intermediate Latin, or the equivalent. If there is any doubt about the adequacy of a student's preparation for the course, please contact the instructor. 

 

CLLA 60520/40520

Latin Survey II: Roman Literary Culture in the Early Empire

Prof. E. Mazurek

MW 3:30 - 4:45, 3 credits

This survey of Latin literature from the end of the republic through the mid empire traces the development of the major genres and literary movements in “Silver” Latin. We shall read in Latin selections from the Augustan poets, the historians of the empire, the tragedies and philosophical works of Seneca, Petronius, the epic poets Statius’ and later lyric, and a few late Latin works. Additional readings will include other Roman and Greek literary works and a sampling of the most important modern studies. This course will also introduce students to scholarly interpretation and methods in the literary and cultural criticism of Latin literature.

Fall 2016 Courses

CLLA 10001-10002  

Beginning Latin I and Beginning Latin II

This two-semester sequence of courses introduces students to the language of the ancient Romans for the first time. It emphasizes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and prepares students to read original Latin texts. An appreciation for ancient Roman culture is also fostered through secondary readings and class discussion.

CLLA 10001 01/60001

Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 1)
Instructor:  Josh Benjamins

4 credit hours

CLLA 10001 02/60001

Beginning Latin I (Hybrid)  (Section 2)
Instructor:  John Izzo

4 credit hours

CLLA 10002 01/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 1)
Instructor: Randolph Ford

4 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10001 or equivalent

CLLA 10002 02/60002

Beginning Latin II (Section 2)
Prof.  T. Mazurek

4 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 10001 or equivalent

CLLA 20003 01/60003

Intermediate Latin (Section 1)
Prof. D. Hernandez

3 credit hours
Prerequisite: CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

CLLA 20003 02/60003

Intermediate Latin (Section 2)
Prof. T. Mazurek

3 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

CLLA 20003 03/60003

Intermediate Latin (Section 3)
Prof. E. Mazurek

3 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 10002, 10111 or equivalent

This second-year language course builds on the work of Beginning Latin I and II. It combines a review of grammar with careful reading of classical Latin authors such as Cornelius Nepos and Ovid. The course improves students' translating skills, introduces methods for studying Latin literature in its historical and cultural contexts, and prepares students for more advanced work in the sophisticated literature of the ancient Romans. Offered each fall semester.

CLLA 30004/60004

Reading and Writing Latin Prose
Prof. B. Krostenko

3 credit hours

This course reviews major topics in Latin syntax, which students practice through compo-sitions and specially designed, targeted readings, to the end of learning to group syntactic phenomena in sets, the fundament of quick and accurate reading.  The course also introduces students to stylistic analysis and historical syntax and semantics through a survey of exemplary texts from various stages of Latin literary history.

CLLA 30013/60013

Roman Lyric Poetry
Prof. G. Müller

3 credit hours
Prerequisite:  CLLA 20004

This third-year course builds on CLLA 20003 and CLLA 20004, and offers close reading of passages from the lyric poetry of such authors as Catullus and Horace.  The lyric form gives precise and economical expression to a wide range of human thoughts and emotions, from the highly personal to the grandly patriotic.  The range of Roman lyric, the technique of its practitioners, and the place of lyric poetry in Roman life are themes that receive special attention.  This course prepares students for advanced offerings in Latin literature, especially CLLA 40023, CLLA 40033, CLLA 40043, and CLLA 40053.  Offered in fall semester, alternate years.

CLLA 40016 01/60016 (Cross-listed with MI 40003/60003, THEO 30004/60001, LIT 73677)

Intro to Christian Latin Texts
Prof. H. Müller

3 credit hours
Prerequisite:  Third year Latin

This course will introduce students to early Christian literature and the language and styles in which scripture, commentaries, homilies, epistles, treatises, hymns, and poetry were written. There is no single phenomenon which we can label Christian Latin. Rather we must trace the influence that the translation of scripture, the changing vernacular, and the Late Antique literary genres had on the various writers and genres of the Latin Christian communities of roughly the second through the fifth centuries AD. While the course's goals include the training of students in the research tools and methods for advanced work in early Christian, late antique, and medieval literature, we shall focus on improving students' abilities to read Latin with understanding and fluency. Preparation for translation in class will constitute the lion's share of homework. Grammar will occupy us as it did the authors we read: orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexicography will not, however, be as uniform as textbooks or dictionaries or grammars of classical Latin lead one to believe. Fundamentals of Latin style (prose and verse) will be emphasized. So too basics of literary history and of ancient literary terms and techniques.