News

Dr. Fauci has a Classics degree!

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Author: Spencer Alexander McDaniel

Dr. Anthony Fauci has been getting a lot of attention lately for his tireless work promoting public safety measures in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Polls consistently find that Dr. Fauci is by far the most trusted person in the United States on matters pertaining to COVID-19. An article published in The New Yorker on 20 April 2020 hails him as “America’s doctor.” On 10 December 2020, Time magazine named him a “Guardian of the Year,” along with “front-line health care workers.”

"Butrint 7: Beyond Butrint" published by Prof. David Hernandez

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Author: Department of Classics

Butrint 7 David Hernandez

Presenting new archaeological studies from recent fieldwork, this volume throws new light on the archaeology and history of the Pavllas River Valley, the Mediterranean alluvial plain in the territory of Butrint, ancient Buthrotum, in southwestern Albania. It gives prominence for the first time to two important sites, Kalivo and Çuka e Aitoit, which are here reinterpreted and shown to have played major roles in the early history of Butrint as it evolved in the later first millennium BC to emerge as the key city of Chaonia in Epirus. Butrint 7 also presents the full excavation report of the Late Bronze Age and Hellenistic fortified site of Mursi, in addition to other archaeological surveys and excavations in the hinterland of Butrint, including the Roman villa maritima at Diaporit, the villa suburbana on the Vrina Plain, and Roman sites on Alinura Bay and at the Customs House, as well as new surveys of the early modern Triangular Fortress and a survey to locate the lost Venetian village of Zarópulo. It also includes a new study of the Hellenistic bronze statuette of Pan found on Mount Mile and of his sanctuary at Butrint. The volume concludes with a comprehensive reassessment of the Pavllas River Valley in relation to Butrint, from the Palaeolithic to the modern eras, examining how dominion, territory, environment and the ‘corrupting sea’ reshaped Butrint and its fluvial corridor diachronically and particularly brought profound territorial, economic and social alterations under the Roman Empire.

 

Ancient Heroes: From Achilles to the Avengers

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Author: Aldo Tagliabue

In an age of uncertainty, we see the rise of dramatic questions. What makes life worth living? Which path do we want our lives to take? If you are interested in these questions, please watch the video and consider joining the course Ancient Heroes: From Achilles to the Avengers (Spring 2021). The course is taught by Prof. Aldo Tagliabue (MWF, 11.40-12.30). We will have great fun exploring the lives of ancient heroes and heroines, and comparing them with heroes from Western movies and the Star Wars series, and with the lives of superheroes and superheroines. The class fulfills the literature requirement.…

Greek and Latin Winter Session

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Author: Sherry Reichold

Music Class Douris Painter

Minding the gap with Greek Prose and Slide to the next Latin level

1. CLGR 20001/60201: Minding the gap with Greek Prose, MTWR 3:30-4:50pm (via Zoom), 2 credits
Come, enjoy some great Greek prose with Prof. Baron and Prof. Tagliabue and get ready for taking advanced Greek in the spring.…

Augustinus, Enarrationes in Psalmos 61-70, edited by Hildegund Müller

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Author: Department of Classics

Enarrationes

Augustine’s commentaries on Psalm 61-70 are mostly based on sermons. In this edition, a special emphasis was laid on the adequate presentation of Augustine’s expressive and nuanced oral style. Each commentary is accompanied by an introduction, in which the known facts on time, date and liturgical circumstances are presented, as well as a precisely reconstructed version of the text of Augustine’s Psalter(s).…

Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship for Experienced Researchers, awarded to Dr. Aldo Tagliabue

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Author: Sherry Reichold

The Department of Classics extends its congratulations to Dr. Aldo Tagliabue, assistant professor, for his recent award of a Humboldt Research Fellowship for Experienced Researchers.  This is a 12-month-long fellowship based at the University of Giessen (Germany).

In Gießen, Dr. Tagliabue will be hosted by Professor Peter Von Möllendorff and will

Award for Excellence in Classics

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Author: Sherry Reichold

Congratulations to Joshua Anthony, recipient of the Award for Excellence in Classical Studies for 2020 in the Department of Classics!  Well done.…

CAMWS Award

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Author: Sherry Reichold

This years CAMWS award (Classical Association of the Middle West and South) was bestowed upon Connor Reilly in the Department of Classics. This award is given to a graduating senior for outstanding accomplishment in undergraduate classical studies.  Congratulations, Connor!…

New Course, Fall 2020: Eternal Rome: Archaeology Fulfills the History Requirement

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Author: Department of Classics

Two thousand years ago, Rome was the capital of an empire stretching across the Mediterranean, from England, Spain and North Africa to Turkey, Iraq and Egypt. Built from the wealth of its expansive dominion, it was the greatest metropolis on earth, at the center of a vast web of interconnected regions and cultures. The city has remained the focus of the Catholic Church and Christianity in Europe for more than 1500 years.

New Course, Fall 2020: Rebels in Myth: from Antigone to the Joker: it fulfills the Literature Requirement

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Author: Sherry Reichold

This class will explore the myths of famous rebels, from Prometheus who challenges the divine order, to Antigone and Medea, both of whom publicly blame the male-centric Athenian society for not giving voice to women and foreigners, and, finally, to Socrates and Plato, who condemn the contemporary world for its contentment with appearances and disinterest in the truth. Since these rebels are still relevant to our society, the discussion of their stories will be combined with modern, contemporary renderings of the same myths, and with the study of rebels in contemporary superheroes stories, such as The Joker and Green Goblin. 

Q&A with Christopher Baron, associate professor in the Department of Classics

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Author: Carrie Gates

In this Q&A, Christopher Baron, an associate professor of classics and concurrent associate professor of history, discusses his research on Greek historians living in the Roman Empire and how we grapple with similar questions today, as well as the strange and interesting things he's learned while editing an encyclopedia on Herodotus — the "Father of History."

Dale Parker, Alumnus

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Author: Department of Classics

Dale Parker, Classics Alumnus (2013), is currently in his first year of his ecclesiastical doctorate in Theology at Pontifica Università della Santa Croce in Rome.  …

Aequora Program Featured on ABC57

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Author: Brigid O'Keefe

The Notre Dame Aequora Program was recently featured on ABC57. A reporter with the network observed Notre Dame Classics students as they taught their fifth grade students about mythology, history, and Latin at Clay International Academy. Clay International students were given a chance to talk to the reporter and excitedly tell her what they were learning about, while Notre Dame students and program director Professor Elizabeth Mazurek expressed their motivations for joining the program and the value it holds. …

Classics Department Trip To See Oedipus Rex

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Author: Brigid O'Keefe

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This past weekend, the Classics Department traveled to Chicago to see a performance of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex at the University of Chicago's Court Theatre. Students and faculty began the day at the Oriental Institute, which displays the history, art, and architecture of the ancient Near East. After lunch and some time to explore the city, the group reconvened at the theatre to enjoy the performance. When asked what he thought of the performance, junior Classics major Will Lamara said, "Seeing the play performed on a modern stage really gave me a different perspective on the story. Reading the text of an ancient play can make it seem stoic and serious, but watching it actually be performed shows that it is just as lively and full of emotion as any modern work."…

Classics professor helps develop scientific term — ‘in fimo’ — for the experimental examination of excrement

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Author: Mark Derewicz

You’ve heard of in vitro (the study of things in test tubes) and in vivo (the study of things in a living system). Now meet in fimo, a new scientific term coined by a Notre Dame classicist and researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine to mean “excrement examined experimentally.” Their proposal — largely written by Luca Grillo, chair and associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Classics — was published this year in the journal Gastroenterology.

New Course, Spring 2020: Democracy Ancient and Modern

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Author: Brigid O'Keefe

This course examines the theory, practice, and development of ancient Greco-Roman democracy. Particular attention is devoted to comparing ancient with modern forms of self-rule. Among the special topics studied are the origins of Greek democracy, its advantages and disadvantages as a form of government, alternatives to democracy, and democracy as an abiding legacy of classical civilization for the modern world. Familiarity with ancient Greco-Roman history is recommended, but not required.…