News

In memoriam: David Ladouceur, 73, associate professor emeritus of classics

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Author: Josh Weinhold

David Ladouceur, an associate professor emeritus in the Department of Classics, died May 8 at his home. He was 73. Ladouceur joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1976 after earning his Ph.D. in classics at Brown University and his bachelor’s degree at Cornell University. He served as department chair for nine years, leading the Department of Modern Classical Languages and then the Department of Classical and Oriental Languages at a time before regional language groups were separated into their own departments.

A Q&A with Karl Berg ’22 on the Early Christian Studies program, coordinating a new graduate conference, and why Notre Dame is a great place for classics and theology research

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Author: Beth Staples

Karl Berg ’22, who earned an M.A. in Early Christian Studies from Notre Dame’s Department of Classics, is co-organizing the Inaugural Graduate Conference on Early Christian Studies, to be held May 23–25 in Jenkins Nanovic Halls and on Zoom. The conference, which will be the first of its kind in the United States, is free and open to the public. Berg will present a paper, “Augustine of Hippo and Late Roman Slavery.” Next up for the Littleton, Colorado, native: pursuing a D.Phil. in ancient history at the University of Oxford.

Notre Dame archaeologist wins fellowship for book on understudied region of ancient Greece

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Author: Pat Milhizer

Located in Albania between Greece and Italy, the Roman forum at Butrint has attracted Notre Dame archaeologist David Hernandez and others for nearly 20 years. They grab pickaxes, shovels and a water pump to reveal a town plaza and emerging technologies of the time that are well-preserved because they stayed submerged underwater for centuries. An associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Classics, Hernandez is now pouring his insight into a book about the Roman forum at Butrint. Supported by a Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University, which he was awarded this spring, the book will explore why Butrint is far more significant than scholars have previously recognized.

New Globally Engaged Citizens program allows Notre Dame students to demonstrate their intercultural competence and language skills

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Author: Josh Weinhold

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures at Notre Dame has launched the Globally Engaged Citizens program, designed to reward students for their engagement with language and culture studies and encourage participation by students who are not required to take language classes. Through a combination of coursework and cultural experiences, the program offers Notre Dame students from all colleges and schools the opportunity to demonstrate that they have spent time during their college experience preparing to be a global citizen.

Caesar in Gaul--two-week seminar

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Author: Department of Classics

Caesar in Gaul is a two-week seminar designed to enhance participants’ appreciation of Caesar's Gallic War. Developed specifically with the AP curriculum in mind, but now open to all students of the influential text, the program includes lectures and seminars led by Luca Grillo (Notre Dame) and Christopher Krebs (Stanford), as well as visits to key sites of the Gallic War

Who was Herodotus?

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Author: Marc G. DeSantis

"There are plenty of things in Herodotus' writing that we can pretty certainly say are not true, and there are many stories that today we would classify as legendary or mythical," Baron said.  Read more.

Classics Research Project receives funding from ND Provost

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Author: Department of Classics

Thanks to a grant from the Provost's office, the international project on the history of Latin school books is planning a series of workshops and lectures. The Digital School Book Project, directed by Prof. Bloomer, ND,  and by Prof. Andrew Irving of the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, is finalizing an online resource for study of the late ancient and medieval texts, commentaries, and translations of the Distichs of Cato

Researchers use AI to unlock the secrets of ancient texts

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Author: Jessica Sieff, Notre Dame News

“There’s a difference between just taking the photos and reading them, and having a program to provide a searchable reading,” said Hildegund Müller, associate professor in the Department of Classics at Notre Dame. “If you consider the texts used in this study — ninth-century manuscripts — that’s an early stage of the Middle Ages. It’s a long time before the printing press. That’s a time when an enormous amount of manuscripts were produced. There is all sorts of information hidden in these manuscripts — unidentified texts that nobody has seen before.”  Read more

Shaun Evans, 2018 Classics Supplementary Major named 2021 Lilly Graduate Fellow

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Author: Department of Classics

“Shaun is an outstanding example of a bright mind formed by the humanities at Notre Dame, having studied in the theology, philosophy and classics departments during his time here. We are exceptionally pleased that his intellectual curiosity, diligent work ethic and commitment to integrating faith and learning have been recognized by the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program,” said Smith.…

‘A dialogue without boundaries’: Classics professor to research the power of ancient narratives in Germany with support of Humboldt Fellowship

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Author: Carrie Gates

Aldo Tagliabue is fascinated by the power of a great narrative to draw the reader in. An assistant professor in the Department of Classics, Tagliabue wants to ensure that the study of ancient narratives encompasses not just the intellectual aspects of literature, but that experiential side, as well. “For many years, there has been a more intellectual approach to ancient narrative, which has had great results. But I think it has missed another vital aspect,” he said. “My research tries to recapture the importance of the full experience of what it means to be a reader — now and in the ancient world."

Award Winners in Classics

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Author: Sherry Reichold

Emma Jones, Endowment for Excellence Award in Classical Studies, 2021 (This award is given by the Department to a graduating senior who has excelled in their Classical Studies)

William LaMarra, CAMWS Award for Excellence in Classical Studies, 2021 (This award is given by the Classical Association of the Middle West and South to graduating seniors chosen by their Departments who have excelled in their Classical Studies)…

Dr. Fauci has a Classics degree!

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Author: Spencer Alexander McDaniel

Dr. Anthony Fauci has been getting a lot of attention lately for his tireless work promoting public safety measures in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Polls consistently find that Dr. Fauci is by far the most trusted person in the United States on matters pertaining to COVID-19. An article published in The New Yorker on 20 April 2020 hails him as “America’s doctor.” On 10 December 2020, Time magazine named him a “Guardian of the Year,” along with “front-line health care workers.”

"Butrint 7: Beyond Butrint" published by Prof. David Hernandez

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Author: Department of Classics

Butrint 7 David Hernandez

Presenting new archaeological studies from recent fieldwork, this volume throws new light on the archaeology and history of the Pavllas River Valley, the Mediterranean alluvial plain in the territory of Butrint, ancient Buthrotum, in southwestern Albania. It gives prominence for the first time to two important sites, Kalivo and Çuka e Aitoit, which are here reinterpreted and shown to have played major roles in the early history of Butrint as it evolved in the later first millennium BC to emerge as the key city of Chaonia in Epirus. Butrint 7 also presents the full excavation report of the Late Bronze Age and Hellenistic fortified site of Mursi, in addition to other archaeological surveys and excavations in the hinterland of Butrint, including the Roman villa maritima at Diaporit, the villa suburbana on the Vrina Plain, and Roman sites on Alinura Bay and at the Customs House, as well as new surveys of the early modern Triangular Fortress and a survey to locate the lost Venetian village of Zarópulo. It also includes a new study of the Hellenistic bronze statuette of Pan found on Mount Mile and of his sanctuary at Butrint. The volume concludes with a comprehensive reassessment of the Pavllas River Valley in relation to Butrint, from the Palaeolithic to the modern eras, examining how dominion, territory, environment and the ‘corrupting sea’ reshaped Butrint and its fluvial corridor diachronically and particularly brought profound territorial, economic and social alterations under the Roman Empire.